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Slide1: 

By, Heather Kasparian

How Illusions Work: 

How Illusions Work An illusion is something that decives the senses or mind. Our brain fills in things with information we already know. For exmple, images on the T.V. don’t really move. Our brain just puts the images together, which triggers the illusion that cartoons walk or words fly across the screen. This happens because our brain has learned to expect movement, or our brain fills in the missing pieces.

Neurons: 

Neurons A neuron is a cell that carries messages through the nervous system. There are 3 types of neurons, the Sensory Neuron, the Inter Neuron, and the Motor Neuron Continued next slide

Neurons Cont.: 

Neurons Cont.

The process of How illusions get to the brain: 

The process of How illusions get to the brain When you first see an illusion, the reaction goes strait to your nerve impulse. The nerve impulses begin in the dendrite of a neuron. The impulse moves very quickly toward the neuron’s cell body ant down the axon until it reaches the axon tip. There is a tiny space called a synapse between each axon tip and the next structure. In order for a nerve impulse to be carried along, it must cross the gap between the axon and the next structure. The axon tips releas chemicals that enable the impulse to cross the synapse. Cont. on next slide

The process of how illusions get to the brain Cont.: 

The process of how illusions get to the brain Cont. If that didn’t happen the impulse would stop at the axon, it would not be passed from sensory neuron, to inter neuron, to motor neuron. Nerve impulses would never reach your brain.

Illusion Examples and Explanations: 

Illusion Examples and Explanations Section 2

Slide8: 

Your challenge is to identify the colors of ink that are used to print the letters of each word. For Ex. On the 1st line you will say Blue. Black. Green. Red. The Challenge Cont. on next pg.

red green pink yellow blue violet green gray orange black purple red green pink yellow blue violet green gray orange black purple: 

red green pink yellow blue violet green gray orange black purple red green pink yellow blue violet green gray orange black purple Connections Cont.

What Happened?: 

What Happened? Your brain is divided up into different regions. Each region has its own task. One region specializes in identifying colors and another specializes in language. When you looked at the first word, each region 'saw' something different. The language part read the word, it saw R, E, and D. It put them together and recognized the word red. It was saying red, red, red! The region that controls identifying colors didn’t care about the word, it saw the ink and recognized it as the color 'blue'. It was saying blue, blue, blue! When the 2 messages arrived at the brain, the brain had 2 different things to say. This created confusion, which made it difficult to read this! From the Book 'Optical Illusion Magic' By Michael A. DiSpezio

Bill Clinton and Al Gore: 

Bill Clinton and Al Gore Looks like Clinton and Gore? Look again!!! Explanation on next slide

How It Works: 

How It Works Nope, they’re both Clinton, just with a different hairstyle. We are all used to seeing Al Gore and Bill Clinton together. At a quick glance, our mind picks up a guy standing next to Bill Clinton. The man has black hair, the 2 men look like a team, or partners. So our mind answers the question of 'who is this man'. If illusions are studied closely, the mind doesn’t have to fill in any blanks. If you examine the picture closely and carefully, you will notice that they are the same man, by the facial expressions and the facial features. From the web page www.eyeillusions.com

Work Cited: 

Work Cited United States. Apple Computer, Inc. 'Grolier.' 1995 DISK COMPACT CD-ROM. US Apple Computer, Inc. 1995. Church, Jok. 'Illusions.' Illusions. (2000) 3pp.Online. Internet. October 15, 2001 Coolidge, Elizabeth, Exline, Joseph D., Jenner, Jan, Cronkite, Donald, Graff, Dawn. Focus on Life Science. Massachusetts: Printice Hall

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