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Philosophy & Literature Undergraduates: 

Philosophy andamp; Literature Undergraduates Researching Your Assessed Essay (Tutorial 2: Searching in LION, MLA andamp; The Philosopher’s Index)

In this Tutorial you will be shown how to…: 

In this Tutorial you will be shown how to… Find your way to a menu of relevant data-bases on the Library web pages Conduct some searches on LION, MLA and Philosopher’s Index Distinguish between bibliographic and full-text results Operate a bridge-link between a bibliographic record and a full-text source

Some thoughts before I begin to search...: 

Some thoughts before I begin to search... Can I search using my own words? Might it help to browse terms stored in the database? What results am I getting? Full-text, references only, or a combination?

Pitching my search correctly: 

Pitching my search correctly Am I using a few general terms so that I am including too much? Am I using too many narrow terms so that I am excluding some useful results? Am I remembering to juxtapose useful variant terms to cover my topic (ie fiction or novel, ethics or morals)?

Slide5: 

From ‘Library Resources’ click on the English subject page

Slide6: 

Now open ‘E-resources’. Notice this direct link to English’s own site.

Slide7: 

Here you can open a menu of English databases

Slide8: 

Notice these very useful collections of primary texts, and scroll on down

Slide9: 

You are going to open LION. Note the description first.

Slide10: 

A lot to choose from! For a subject search, click here. ‘Authors’ only delivers primary sources.

Slide11: 

For a better search-page, open ‘Criticism’.

Slide12: 

See how your search terms can be entered in different boxes. ‘Subject’ is the best place for the name of a writer. Note various ways of limiting your search

Slide13: 

For a narrower search, limit your second term to the Title box.

Slide14: 

This gives you mainly reviews (you haven’t set any limiters).

Slide15: 

For a broader search, you experiment with looking for ‘Plato’ anywhere. Still no limiters set.

Slide16: 

A mixed bag, but some useful results among them. You open Baldwin.

Slide17: 

Rather a lot of subjects! Scroll down.

Slide18: 

Your result is from a collection of essays, so a list of contents is provided.

Slide19: 

For a new search you decide to restrict yourself to articles only.

Slide20: 

This seems a disappointing result for two such basic key-terms.

Slide21: 

The problem may be with the ‘Subject’. It’s better to give more of the name. If in doubt, open the list.

Slide22: 

Ah! Your search defaulted on the wrong Coleridge. Tick the correct one further down.

Slide23: 

So don’t forget to use the list which will focus your search down to one individual. Another way is to put ‘Coleridge’ here, but you will miss some material.

Slide24: 

You now have a much better result.

Slide25: 

You haven’t limited ‘Kant’ to the Title, so here are a broad range of results. Items with this icon are full-text.

Slide26: 

You decide to open item 9.

Slide27: 

You are given a full reference, with an abstract summary. Scroll down for the article text.

Slide28: 

This is your text (in HTML format).

Slide29: 

To trace your key-term ‘Kant’ click on ‘Edit’ and ‘Find’.

Slide30: 

Type the term again and click here.

Slide31: 

This takes you straight to the paragraph where your term occurs.

Slide32: 

You want to save the article so you tick this box.

Slide33: 

Now open ‘Marked List’.

Slide34: 

Here is your reference. You can decide how you want to save. Remember that most Library terminals are not linked to printers. Prefer Email.

Slide35: 

You want to read a review of a recent book. Tick the box here.

Slide36: 

Here is a relevant result. Note it is not full-text but bibliographic only. Where full-text isn’t available, copy the reference and check Library holdings.

Slide37: 

You return to the menu to open MLA. Note its scope and starting date MLA also contains some materials on Continental Philosophy andamp; Theory

Slide38: 

It’s best to get used to ‘Advanced Search’ right away, as it gives you so much more scope!

Slide39: 

The Search defaults to ‘Keyword’but here are some other ways to search. Careful! ‘Author’ means critic or scholar here.

Slide40: 

You enter your search-terms using the standard default.

Slide41: 

You find 8 results (in all languages!)

Slide42: 

Scroll down to select item 8.

Slide43: 

This is the bibliographic entry. You now know of the existence of the article! Click here for a possible full-text link.

Slide44: 

No link is available – perhaps because the your article dates from 1979. You return to the previous screen.

Slide45: 

Click here to see if Warwick owns a run of the journal.

Slide46: 

Yes! Warwick has a complete set. You will need to make your own photocopy. The e-link begins too late for your reference.

Slide47: 

You want to search by a writer’s full name. The best way is to open this pop-up to get the exact form.

Slide48: 

Click on the largest file. You now have at your command all the records relating to Nabokov.

Slide49: 

You can 'throw' against this another subject term to focus your search. Keep the standard default for the second term.

Slide50: 

Here are the results. Item 2 looks interesting.

Slide51: 

Rather an obscure journal. See if you can find a full-text link.

Slide52: 

No luck! See if you can find a print-run at Warwick. Return to previous screen and click on the Warwick Library link as before.

Slide53: 

This is quite an uncommon journal so it’s not held at Warwick. Return to the full record of the article.

Slide54: 

You feel this article would be really helpful, so you tick the box to save it. Once ticked, click here.

Slide55: 

You can now email the reference to yourself (or use the Export function to download).

Slide56: 

Fill in the subject line so that you recognise the incoming email. Armed with full details you can ask your supervisor for permission to use Warwick’s free Document Supply Service. Document Supply forms are kept opposite the Floor 1 Enquiry Desk.

Slide57: 

Meanwhile, item 5 might be some use. You decide to look at that.

Slide58: 

Ever hopeful, you try the full-text link once more…

Slide59: 

A yes at last. There is a link to JSTOR available. Click here.

Slide60: 

The link takes you straight to the text. You can email/download (as you did in the previous tutorial) from JSTOR.

Slide61: 

You decide to repeat your search, but using a variant term.

Slide62: 

Some different results from last time. You scroll on down.

Slide63: 

Item 8 could be interesting. You open it. Items 7-8 are the same: one is a reprinted book essay, the other the original article. See ‘Type’.

Slide64: 

Try the various links as before…

Slide65: 

You find there is a printed set of the journal in the Library.

Slide66: 

Now return the ‘Library Resources’ to open the Philosophy Subject page

Slide67: 

Click here to open the e-links Don’t forget this is where you go to find this tutorial and others like it. Link to your Department here

Slide68: 

You now open the ‘Philosopher’s Index’. Note its cut-off date (1940).

Slide69: 

To juxtapose terms and refine your searching, you prefer ‘Advanced’.

Slide70: 

This is your choice of fields for each search term. ‘Descriptors’ for standard terms selected by PI, whether or not used in the title . Use this when searching for a philosopher by name.

Slide71: 

To begin, this is a simple default search.

Slide72: 

A large set to sift through, as the search is picking up your terms anywhere andamp; everywhere…

Slide73: 

…as you scroll down, you see the relevance is often low.

Slide74: 

You decide to refine your search by setting more exact fields.

Slide75: 

All these results relate in a more integral way to the notion of ‘Self’.

Slide76: 

You scroll through these (bibliographic) records, then decide to investigate the full-text link to item 20.

Slide77: 

This window offers you a link to JSTOR

Slide78: 

The link takes you straight to the full text.

Slide79: 

You try a more general search, but using the Descriptors

Slide80: 

Because the terms are so general, the results are numerous.

Slide81: 

One way to reduce the quantity of results is to set some external limits.

Slide82: 

You can limit by type of document or language.

Slide83: 

You can limit your results to the English language…

Slide84: 

You decide it’s the journal articles which matter to you…

Slide85: 

This has stripped 92 less relevant results out of your search.

Slide86: 

You can also refine the search internally by adding another term.

Slide87: 

This produces concentrated results. You decide to link to item 2.

Slide88: 

The window offers you a link to LION.

Slide89: 

It drops you at the reference first, which you can open to see the full text.

Slide90: 

The abstract also helps you to confirm the relevance of the article.

Slide91: 

Not all links can provide you with full text via Warwick. So you decide the save the references by ticking the boxes. Click here to email or download

Slide92: 

Fill in your email address and note the topic. This is the automatic default

Slide93: 


If you are still a bit unsure…: 

If you are still a bit unsure… Go through the Tutorial once more Look carefully at how searches are set out on the screen Ask for further help Contact peter.larkin@warwick.ac.uk or jessica.duffield@warwick.ac.uk

Slide95: 


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