Winter Car Maintenance Tips

Views:
 
Category: Others/ Misc
     
 

Presentation Description

Winter Car Maintenance Tips, we lay out the top 7 tips for getting your car through the winter and before the winter starts.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

PowerPoint Presentation:

Winter Car Maintenance Tips

PowerPoint Presentation:

How to Search For a Used Car for Sale Do a little research if you are contemplating to buying an old car and wondering where to find used cars for sale. Use the World Wide Web to looking for used car information, used quality cars, and used cars' reviews, or you can choose to buy a second hand car from a localdealer On advertisements in the newspapers, some people also prefer to sell their used car. You must consider your budget and accordingly search for the car that serves your needs the best. If you looking for a used car, that’s very easy to find a lot of information on the Internet. Step 1: Check for steam The one surefire indication that you’ve really got an overheating engine is that old B-movie standby: plumes of steam pouring out before your eyes. Except it likely won’t be that dramatic, so take a closer look. If you see any steam at all, proceed to Step 3. Steam is bad. Take it seriously. Take these steps now to keep your car on the road all winter 1. CONSIDER WINTER TIRES 2. WIPERS FOR WINTER 3. IS YOUR BATTERY JUICED? 4. CHECK YOUR NETHERS 5. THE ANTIFREEZE 6. CHECK YOUR TIRE PRESSURE 7. WAX YOUR LIGHTS

PowerPoint Presentation:

STEP 1 : CONSIDER WINTER TIRES Styling priorities have led to manufacturers fitting wider, low-profile tires on a variety of cars. Wide and low profile, on balance, makes a tire worse in the snow. Pressures to improve tire fuel economy have also worked against the snow utility of all-seasons. Winter tires have improved their behavior from the era of knobby, loud "snows" that looked like they belonged on an army truck. New tread patterns and rubber compounds make them quieter on dry roads, yet even more effective on frozen stuff.

PowerPoint Presentation:

STEP 2 : WIPERS FOR WINTER Fog, snow and rain will cut down your visibility in winter. Check your wiper blades, which have a lifespan of about a year. If your car doesn't have the newer "beam blade" style wipers, consider a pair, especially for the winter months. The beam style blades don't have an external spring to freeze up. When snow or other freezing precipitation threaten, make sure you turn off the wipers when you park so that the next time you turn on your car, the wiper motor's not fighting to get frozen wipers moving. This can burn out the motor.

PowerPoint Presentation:

STEP 3 : IS YOUR BATTERY JUICED? Winter puts more stress on your battery, particularly if you park your car outdoors. Avoid the sinking feeling of hearing nothing when you hit the ignition with a proactive check of your battery and charging system now. Repair shops don't usually charge very much to load-test your battery, and some car-parts stores will do it for free.

PowerPoint Presentation:

STEP 4 : CHECK YOUR NETHERS To improve aerodynamics and save fuel, today's cars are equipped with increasingly elaborate underbody panels and low-hanging air dams. These can be vulnerable to damage, and driving over a snowdrift in the winter could turn a small problem into a more expensive one. So before the ground's too chilly to lie on, take a look under the car, starting from the front, to see if there's anything loose flapping about. Maybe you can just pop it back into place. Maybe a zip tie will take care of it.

PowerPoint Presentation:

STEP 5 : THE ANTIFREEZE This is many people's first thought when it comes to winter car care. "Flush and fill" promotional signs abound at service stations as the weather cools. But chances are good your engine coolant (a better name for it) is just fine for the winter ahead. If you've followed your car's service schedule regularly, give this pitch a pass. Most newer cars have been fitted with coolants that can last as long as five years or 150,000 miles. Read your owner's manual.

PowerPoint Presentation:

STEP 6 : CHECK YOUR TIRE PRESSURE Tires lose a pound of pressure for every drop of 10 degrees Fahrenheit. An underinflated tire won't "bite" through snow down to the pavement as well as one at pressure. It's similar to hydroplaning on water -- and just as dangerous. You may have heard the guidance to let air out of your tires for sand or snow to get more contact surface area. That only applies only if the surface is bottomlessly soft, like a beach or foot-deep, unplowed snow -- not the mix of cleared road, ice and packed snow most of us encounter in daily driving.

PowerPoint Presentation:

STEP 7 : WAX YOUR LIGHTS Okay, we admit it's a little detail, but in winter's gloom and short days, every last lumen you can squeeze out of your headlamps is going to improve your safety. Here's an easy two-minute drill: Make sure the headlamps are clean of dirt, rub car wax (any type will do) on the lamps, let it dry and buff it off. Repeat. For bonus points, do the taillights. The slippery surface you leave behind will be less likely to build up an "icicle" coat when road slush refreezes on your car -- and will make it easier to remove it if it does.

PowerPoint Presentation:

For more information Quixl Auto Repairs and Services Inc 35 Railroad Street, Brampton, ON Read more at : http://quixlauto.com/ Phone 1800-978-4950 Email quixlsl@yahoo.ca

authorStream Live Help