Hiby International Panel

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Presented by Dr. Elly Hiby at the Alliance for Contraception in Cats & Dogs’ 4th International Symposium on Non-Surgical Contraceptive Methods of Pet Population Control, April 8-10, 2010, in Dallas, Texas, U.S.

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Dog and cat reproduction control around the world : 

Dog and cat reproduction control around the world Dr Elly Hiby Head of Companion Animals  World Society for the Protection of Animals

WSPA : 

WSPA Promoting animal welfare for 25+ years International organisation (15 offices worldwide) WSPA’s work is focused on four animal welfare areas: Companion animals Commercial exploitation of wildlife Farm animals Disaster management

WSPA – Companion animal population management : 

WSPA – Companion animal population management Balance of campaigning and project work In 2009 Worked with governments in 27 counties 10 dog population and rabies control projects

WSPA – Companion animal population management : 

WSPA – Companion animal population management

WSPA – Companion animal population management : 

WSPA – Companion animal population management Balance of campaigning and project work In 2009 Worked with governments in 27 counties 10 dog population and rabies control projects Funded the sterilisation of nearly 20,000 dogs and cats and vaccination of further >35,000 Average medicines cost $7.50 ($3-$15) Average full cost $30 ($10-$52)

Role of reproduction control : 

Role of reproduction control Important component but ≠ population management How and why companion animals are acquired How and why they may become unwanted How they are cared for Underpinned by legislation, registration and identification

Slide 7: 

HUMANE DOG POPULATION MANAGEMENT GUIDANCE Available on:www.icam-coalition.org

5 observations important to developing/ delivering reproduction control techniques : 

5 observations important to developing/ delivering reproduction control techniques Ownership status of stray animals

Whose dogs are these? : 

Whose dogs are these? Unowned (‘Wild’ or ‘Feral’) Owned roaming Owned abandoned/lost

Whose dogs are these? : 

Whose dogs are these? Unowned (‘Wild’ or ‘Feral’) Owned roaming Owned abandoned/lost

Whose dogs are these? : 

Whose dogs are these? Owned roaming Include ‘community owned’ Hence mode of delivery should include local human population

Colombo dog population management programme : 

Colombo dog population management programme

Colombo dog population management programme : 

Colombo dog population management programme 46% owned roaming Community owned CNR? But risks establishing roaming dogs as NGO responsibility Wanted to build on current concern and limited care

Colombo dog population management programme : 

Colombo dog population management programme 46% owned roaming Community owned Community Liaison Officer Bring your own dogs Volunteer caretakers Community support Reduced catching

Colombo dog population management programme : 

Colombo dog population management programme >85% vaccinated 60-70% females sterilised Reduction in dog rabies in 1st year by 50% Reduction in lactating females from 20% to 5% Improved body condition and skin condition

5 observations important to developing/ delivering reproduction control techniques : 

5 observations important to developing/ delivering reproduction control techniques Ownership status of stray animals Overpopulation or balancing supply with demand

Too many dogs? Overpopulation? : 

Too many dogs? Overpopulation? Not always about numbers People do want dogs, but they want to manage reproduction, breeding from the right dogs at the right time Closed reproductively healthy population

Zanzibar dog population management programme : 

Zanzibar dog population management programme

Zanzibar dog population management programme : 

Zanzibar dog population management programme Community Liaison Officer Travels with mobile clinic Explains services and asks village to be involved in service delivery Village selects dogs for sterilisation and those to be left for breeding

5 observations important to developing/ delivering reproduction control techniques : 

5 observations important to developing/ delivering reproduction control techniques Ownership status of stray animals Overpopulation or balancing supply with demand Side effects

How important are side effects? : 

How important are side effects? Individual animal’s welfare Risk to the reputation of the project and hence community involvement and cooperation Validates initial suspicion of sterilisation

5 observations important to developing/ delivering reproduction control techniques : 

5 observations important to developing/ delivering reproduction control techniques Ownership status of stray animals Overpopulation or balancing supply with demand Side effects The future demand for reproduction control

Future demand for companion animal reproduction control : 

Future demand for companion animal reproduction control ↑ pet ownership <↑ companion animal care knowledge and small animal medicine = ↑ abandonment ↑ affluence ↓ tolerance for roaming companion animals ↑ demand for population management including reproduction control

5 observations important to developing/ delivering reproduction control techniques : 

5 observations important to developing/ delivering reproduction control techniques Ownership status of stray animals Overpopulation or balancing supply with demand Side effects The future demand for reproduction control Priorities for non-surgical products from the perspective of the projects in the developing world

Priorities from the perspective of projects in developing world : 

Priorities from the perspective of projects in developing world Approved by regulatory agencies as safe (for animals and for the humans administering) and effective Safe for animals at varying life stages, including pregnancy Permanent, though there may be some opportunity for long-term (3+ years) products Need rabies boosters Could be delivered alongside vaccination, hence even contraceptive effect for one year would be beneficial Deliverable in a single injection or treatment Animals can be handled or caught by well trained animal handlers so oral not necessary

Priorities from the perspective of projects in developing world : 

Priorities from the perspective of projects in developing world Products available for effective use in both male and female, dogs and cats Females are the priority as they usually are the limiting factor population growth. Documented effects on behaviour and health Sexual behaviour is often considered a nuisance Can be provided at affordable rates for use in indigent or low-income client populations The need in the developing world is extremely large and is set to increase, but funds available to pay for sterilisation is extremely limited. Full cost < $30 per animal

How can we help? : 

How can we help? Advice in development stage as to limitations and opportunities in the field Field trials to refine delivery and measure impact on population dynamics

Thank you for listening : 

Thank you for listening

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